HOME           RELATED LINKS           PHOTOS OF ACTIVITIES


WATERSHED MONITORING LINKS:

SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT INFORMATION

May 2017 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

October 2016 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

May 2016 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

October 2015 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

May 2015 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

OCTOBER 2014 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

May 2014 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

October 2013 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

May 2013 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

October 2012 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

May 2012 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

October 2011 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

May 2011 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

October 2010 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

MAY 2010 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

OCTOBER 2009 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

MAY 2009 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

The high bacteria readings were not where we've come to expect them, but with just one exception (SC9), the sites with the highest E coli readings (at or above 1000) also had the lowest transparency readings (less than 25cm). (SC9 flows through a large pasture but no cattle were in sight at the time)

Eight sites met the primary contact standard (235 cfu/100 ml) and seven exceeded the secondary contact standard (2880 cfu/100 ml).

OCTOBER 2008 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

Bacteria levels were comparable to last fall in the rural areas (or slightly higher), but lower in the urban areas. Only three sites met the primary contact standard (235 cfu/100 ml) and there were no sites that exceeded the secondary contact standard (2880 cfu/100 ml).

MAY 2008 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

Twenty two of our 54 snapshot sites met the A1-A3 Primary Contact standard of 235 cfu/100 ml, and only three sites exceeded the A2 Secondary Contact standard of 2880 cfu/100 ml. This compares to only four (meeting) and six (exceeding) in October 2007. Lynette noted that within their statewide monitoring network the highest median E. coli level in eight years of sampling ocurred last October (see MedianEcoli_bymonth_statewide.pdf). And though unusually high, our median bacteria level was lower than the statewide median (see Squaw Creek Snapshots vs Statewide - Boxplots). Note again that the highest levels of bacteria were found in our urban waterways.

OCTOBER 2007 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

Results of the October 2007 Snapshot revealed especially high levels of E coli bacteria, the highest levels appearing to be from stormwater runoff within the city of Ames. Readings of 1100-1600 cfu/100ml along the length of Squaw Creek OUTSIDE of Ames may be attributable to an ongoing manure release (see Broken pipe results in manure release near Stratford Ames Tribune 10/17/2007). On the map below, E coli levels below 235 cfu/100ml are marked in green, and those in excess of 2880 are marked in red. (Compare to previous results).


CLICK
HERE for a closeup of the Ames URBAN SITES.         -   Maps created with fGIS.

OCTOBER 2006 and MAY 2007 SQUAW CREEK SNAPSHOT DATA:

Maps created by Ashley Wendt, Graduate Research Assistant with the ISU Dept. of Natural Resources Ecology and Management